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Inspiration – Low Fashion February 9, 2010

Posted by Lauren Cooke in Blogs, Fashion, Inspiration.
Tags: , , ,
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You guys have probably noticed that Cie’s blogging all too often inspires me to write something, or do something, or talk about doing something. She is just one of those bloggers, and one of those girls, who often manages to say exactly what I am thinking, and so I read her blog and pop on over to mine to have my own say.

Her latest post is about why fashion bloggers are so successful – because we are about the fashion you can wear, the looks people can actually pull off, and not about pure catwalk art. We aren’t high fashion, but just style and necessity and real life lumpy bumpy imperfect people.

So this got me thinking that maybe high fashion is out of date. Maybe this concept of people dressing up in peculiar visionary costumes and outfits is taken far too seriously in a world where in actuality they cannot dictate what we wear. In fact, maybe what should have always been an inspiration has really become a bible. The law of the catwalks, the choices they make, can influence hundreds of fashion conscious men and women to buy the most peculiar things, to wear to oddest outfits (and to look darn uncomfortable doing so). With the click of a finger, fashion fans are at high fashion’s every beck and call.

So maybe low fashion needs a revolution. We need a magazine that shows us, normal and freaky and strange and making fashion mistakes in with the bargain. One that shows that girls can sometimes leave the house wearing two different shoes, or that navy can actually look quite cool with black. The low fashion that sees us have to find yet another way to wear that old t-shirt because we can’t afford a replacement, or spending all our money on beautiful shoes and having to wear them with a bin bag. The fashion that is graceful just as often as it is silly, funky just as often as it is smart – our fashion. Low fashion.

You know what though? If a low fashion magazine came on our shelves, about normal people and their normal inspirational stories? I would be far more inclined to pick that off the shelf than I would be to choose Vogue.

Fill out our market research questionnaire about whether this could actually be a viable magazine here!

If you like this idea, see our latest post on the concept here – a blog on it is to come!

(Image from here)

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Comments»

1. Amber - February 9, 2010

“You know what though? If a low fashion magazine came on our shelves, about normal people and their normal inspirational stories? I would be far more inclined to pick that off the shelf than I would be to choose Vogue.”

I would too. I’m actually pretty tired of aspirational fashion, or editorials that are all about how “edgy” the person is, when actually they’re wearing something that would get you laughed out of anywhere in my town. High fashion is amazing to look at, yes, but these days I’m much more interested in seeing the things that people ACTUALLY wear (and wear in small towns and to their jobs, not just to mix with other “edgy” fashion people :) ), which is why I think fashion blogging is so popular these days: it gives you something you can actually be inspired by, rather than something you can only ever look at and admire.

2. Angel - February 10, 2010

I love looking at Style.com to see what “high fashion” wants us to aspire to for the next season. But what I prefer doing is going through the archives of some of my favourite bloggers to see what they wore last summer, or last winter, because it’s something that someone has worn in their day-to-day life.

I’m glad someone finally placed why blogger’s have an appeal. And I agree that I would buy a “low fashion” magazine over Vogue.

3. Diana - February 11, 2010

I totally agree with you! It would be so amazing to see a glossy magazine that just featured real people wearing real clothes, talking about how they can mix thrift store finds with Anthropologie splurges with vintage duds. I still subscribe to a few fashion magazines, but most leave me feeling unsatisfied. A magazine that could capture the essence of what the style blogosphere is doing, that would be amazing. I think it would do very well.

4. Jess - February 15, 2010

Amen! I’m tired of seeing magazines with outfits that just don’t work in a real workplace. I’m sick of looking at their shopping lists and finding that most pieces are only available in NYC, LA, or that the “price available upon request”. As in, if you have to request, then the price is too high for you. My husband has great success finding outfits he wants in his magazines and wonders why I can’t get it together using mine. The difference is that his magazines have a few high-end pieces, but mostly feature things you can find in stores across the country for decent prices.

I would totally buy that magazine. I’d even subscribe to it!

5. Basse Mode – A Magazine About Low Fashion « A Typical Atypical - February 17, 2010

[...] Wordy Business. Tags: Fashion, magazines, publishing, Writing trackback You may well have read my post last week talking about a magazine about Low Fashion. Essentially, a magazine about real women in [...]

6. Links à la Mode : The IFB Weekly Roundup | Independent Fashion Bloggers - February 18, 2010

[...] Mode, but what I did find was a lot of posts focused on fashion, style and image in the real world. A Typical Atypical calls for a low fashion revolution and Idiosyncratic Style urges you to bring out your cocktail [...]

7. jenn - February 18, 2010

my yes, well put. I’m trying to work on a webzine encompassing a bit of everything, but since I’m editing, it’ll be mostly fashion-y stuff…
we’re only working on the first issue (very, very slowly) right now, but you’ve sparked an idea for issue 2 ;)
thanks!

(PS, i haven’t been over to say so, but congrats on BSB blog of the month, it was close there!)
jenn.x

8. roni - February 18, 2010

My perspective differs a tad from the rest of the ladies on here. While, bloggers are special because they do what they magazines don’t, creating a magazine that does what the bloggers do leaves the bloggers basically in the crap hole lol. There’s something amazing about picking up a high end magazine and looking at clothes that I would never wear outside. The fact that I can take one aspect of that look and incorporate it into my everyday look is the reason why I love fashion.

I love the fact that for fantasy I can go to the glossy pages and realism I can actually talk to the blog owner! In this case would be you, I think the blogosphere would lose it’s intimacy if magazines started doing what we did!

Lauren Cooke - February 20, 2010

Hi Roni

Interesting points. I am not so much suggesting that all magazines start doing this, but that there is a physical option for real people wearing fashion. Blogs are all well and good, and great for everyday reading, but a compliation of that which you can flick through in the bath or when tucked up in bed would be lovely.

Plus, we will still feature catwalks etc, but not becasue we believe everything they say.

I don’t think we will leave bloggers in the crap hole! After all, blogging is more than a magazine concept – it is a community and a daily read – not a monthly publication.

xx

9. Links à la Mode | DailyDivaDish - February 18, 2010

[...] Mode, but what I did find was a lot of posts focused on fashion, style and image in the real world. A Typical Atypical calls for a low fashion revolution and Idiosyncratic Style Intrinsically Florrie learns to love her [...]

10. Links à la Mode: The IFB Weekly Roundup | Fashion Pulse Daily - February 18, 2010

[...] Mode, but what I did find was a lot of posts focused on fashion, style and image in the real world. A Typical Atypical calls for a low fashion revolution and Idiosyncratic Style urges you to bring out your cocktail [...]

11. links a la mode | the clothing menu - February 19, 2010

[...] Mode, but what I did find was a lot of posts focused on fashion, style and image in the real world. A Typical Atypical calls for a low fashion revolution and Idiosyncratic Style urges you to bring out your cocktail [...]

12. Melanie - February 19, 2010

“If a low fashion magazine came on our shelves, about normal people and their normal inspirational stories? I would be far more inclined to pick that off the shelf than I would be to choose Vogue.”

I’m torn. On one hand, I’d really like to see everyday stylish people wearing more attainable labels. But I don’t know if that kind of content alone would move me to purchase a low fashion mag. I think I’d miss seeing models in highly stylized settings; I like the “fantasy.”

Then again, I’m sick of seeing the same white, superskinny teenagers in one designer head-to-toe over and over again in editorials (Vogue being the worst offender).

In any event, you bring up some very good points about the importance of low fashion and how tiresome aspirational fashion has become. Brava!

13. Links à la Mode : Style vs. Fashion | THE COVETED - February 19, 2010

[...] Mode, but what I did find was a lot of posts focused on fashion, style and image in the real world. A Typical Atypical calls for a low fashion revolution and Idiosyncratic Style urges you to bring out your cocktail [...]

14. Deb Schrodt - February 19, 2010

i agree with Amber’s post…. I lived in Manhattan for 28 years and saw more “Edgy People” than i care to mention. Also i am sooooo tired of
looking at lines where the clothes are modeled by girls that look like they are playing dress up in their Mothers clothing

15. T. - February 19, 2010

I think I want both: I want to “ooh” and “aah” over runway pictures and think about how I can work the latest trends into my wardrobe, and I also want to compliment blogers on how “stylish yet wearable” (or something like that) their outfits are. Without high fashion, bloggers might be a lot less creative! But you are right, high fashion shouldn’t be taken too seriously. And just because someone can afford a Hermes bag, that doesn’t make their style better than that of other people.

16. Links à la Mode: The IFB Weekly Roundup | TheWorkingWardrobe.com - February 19, 2010

[...] Mode, but what I did find was a lot of posts focused on fashion, style and image in the real world. A Typical Atypical calls for a low fashion revolution and Idiosyncratic Style urges you to bring out your cocktail [...]

17. Links a la Mode: Style vs Fashion | Unfunded - February 19, 2010

[...] Mode, but what I did find was a lot of posts focused on fashion, style and image in the real world. A Typical Atypical calls for a low fashion revolution and Idiosyncratic Style urges you to bring out your cocktail [...]

18. Links à la Mode: Style vs Fashion - February 19, 2010

[...] Mode, but what I did find was a lot of posts focused on fashion, style and image in the real world. A Typical Atypical calls for a low fashion revolution and Idiosyncratic Style urges you to bring out your cocktail [...]

19. Emily - February 20, 2010

I make my living off of finding low fashion. I sort of have the same goal, only I don’t have a magazine so much as a website. I open up Vogue, find the “price upon request” pieces, and search for the affordable “mock-offs” online. Budget conscious fashionistas can come to the site and find all of those trends in one spot.

Sort of a start, right?

20. 3stylelife - February 20, 2010

There’s an important distinction here; and I think the success of it is due to fidelity (in the sense of picture/video/production quality).

People are drawn to the fantastic, the amazing, the incredible. We like to see what can be done with no limits (be they creativity, skill, or money). When we see things like this, we want to see them as perfectly as possible; in high definition, on large glossy pages. Watching a fashion week show in moderate quality on a small Youtube video just doesn’t stack up!

On the other hand, we’re also strongly interested in what can be done within the limits of our own life. These limits are well understood by us bloggers, and further, we’re not doing things that require HD, perfect lighting, and a powerfan blowing our hair just right. Our looks would have tiny flaws blown up if put in magazines (because of the limits we have), and thus are much more effective in this world (online).

21. IFB Presents: Links á la Mode | dramatis personae - February 20, 2010

[...] Mode, but what I did find was a lot of posts focused on fashion, style and image in the real world. A Typical Atypical calls for a low fashion revolution and Idiosyncratic Style urges you to bring out your cocktail [...]

22. Style Vs. Fashion: Links à la Mode | Bonne Vie - February 20, 2010

[...] Mode, but what I did find was a lot of posts focused on fashion, style and image in the real world. A Typical Atypical calls for a low fashion revolution and Idiosyncratic Style urges you to bring out your cocktail [...]

23. Steff Metal - February 21, 2010

I’ve always looked at high fashion as an artform worn on the body. not my body, but someone’s body. I find, because of the human figure involved, I can connect with the fashion world more than the art on the walls of a gallery. For that reason. I’ve always looked at fashion mags as a source of art, not style advice.

Although, I’m part of a subculture that exists on the edge of everything. We have our own fashion “rules”, our own “mainstream”, our own “essential pieces” and our own standard of “WTF are you wearing?”

We even have our own fashion magazines (although some of these are doing much better in blog form). They’re intensely popular because you have to be part of our group, part of our culture, to “get it”. I think a “Low Fashion” magazine is a subculture publication for fashion lovers, and I think it would actually be hugely successful. I say it’s an excellent idea!

24. F (The Very Subjective) - February 21, 2010

this got me into thinking, that actually it has been like this all the time (well, not ALL the time, but since the catwalk as we know it appeared) – there was fashion and then there was street style, and street style inspired fashion. and now the catwalk fashion takes over the streets (sort of), and street style isn’t inspiring catwalk fashion as it used to and vice versa.

change ought to come, and it better come soon.
and, of course, noone who is in the industry will do anything to change it.
so – we have to.
no, let me rephrase that: we must!

25. Links à la Mode: This Week's Edition | sfindiefashion.com - February 21, 2010

[...] Mode, but what I did find was a lot of posts focused on fashion, style and image in the real world. A Typical Atypical calls for a low fashion revolution and Idiosyncratic Style urges you to bring out your cocktail [...]

26. Links á la Mode | Style Vs. Fashion « A Typical Atypical - February 22, 2010

[...] Mode, but what I did find was a lot of posts focused on fashion, style and image in the real world. A Typical Atypical calls for a low fashion revolution and Idiosyncratic Style urges you to bring out your cocktail [...]

27. Idiosyncratic Style» Blog Archive » Links A La Mode: Style vs. Fashion - February 22, 2010

[...] Atypical – What girls want to read and bloggers changing fashion [...]

28. Links à la Mode: Style vs Fashion « twentyteneightyfour - February 22, 2010

[...] Mode, but what I did find was a lot of posts focused on fashion, style and image in the real world. A Typical Atypical calls for a low fashion revolution and Idiosyncratic Style urges you to bring out your cocktail [...]

29. TatoOm - February 22, 2010

It is really no surprising that everyone here is agreeing with you cos you’re just as right as real life could be and that doesn’t mean to be ordinary but to come clean about fashion, obviously we all like those pretty gowns and high fashion that designers offers us each season but to be truth most of all can’t affor it and to be honest is not an achivement to see how great they look at the runway cos they were made exactly to look like it , each single piece was desing thinking how it would be combined and shown to all of us. What is really somenthing to be amazed is to find out there in a day to day life people who can managed to wake up each morning and look faboulous with what they have just by adding their personal style, now that’s the big deal: to be stylish enough to make look great even the most cheapest t’shirt!!

30. Vivian - February 23, 2010

New to your post (found thru IFB).

Love this and will post something about this and link back to your post (probably sometime this week). That is exactly what I love about fashion blogs and seeing how real women translate what could be the same thing I have or saw, in a totally different way. Different perspectives and manipulation of “low fashion” items breeds more creativity and inspiration than Harper’s or Vogue [for me].

31. Links à la Mode : The IFB Weekly Roundup | Midtown Girl - March 22, 2010

[...] Mode, but what I did find was a lot of posts focused on fashion, style and image in the real world. A Typical Atypical calls for a low fashion revolution and Idiosyncratic Style urges you to bring out your cocktail [...]

32. » Accessories & Things Style Bust - April 4, 2010

[...] A Typical Atypical – What girls really want to read about, and why fashion bloggers are changing the face of fashion [...]

33. Sean Swag - August 9, 2010

cool

34. Clothing online store - January 16, 2011

Yeah, great points about the current state of fashion. I wonder what 2011 will be like for fashion styles?

35. Basse Mode: The low fashion magazine :: - January 30, 2011

[...] few weeks ago on Twitter, I butted into a conversation a couple of my fellow bloggers (the lovely Lauren and Fi) were having about the lack of glossy magazines that showcase realistic fashion. Taking [...]

36. http://semiformaldresses.org - February 21, 2011

I wish in 2011 designers will focus more on innovative factor than commerciality. Great fashion tips nonetheless Lauren. Keep it up

37. be yourself quotes - October 29, 2011

Oh yes! I highly agree with you. Thanks for posting this useful article, reading this really made my fashionable day. If you know what I mean ;)


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